Make your own free website on Tripod.com

EDITING--Manuscripts, Short Stories, Ad Copy and More!

Writing Dialogue
Home
A Pertinent Question
Update in July 2008
What I WILL and WILL NOT edit--Pls Read!
Editing Recommendation
EDITING WORKS OF FICTION
FREELANCE EDITING
ABOUT ME
My other websites
HOW IT WORKS
BEFORE SUBMITTING~ A Few Suggestions
WRITING TIPS AND LINKS
FROM PLEASED CLIENTS
BEING A WRITER

Here I am again, telling you what NOT to do as I've edited another novel. Here's my tip this time. Use this formula:

dialogue + action, action + dialogue

Use this when you write. After 2-3 sentences of dialogue, throw in some action or description or internal dialogue of mc (if he/she/it isn't the one speaking.) After 2-3 sentences of description (of physical surroundings and/or character(s)) or action, throw in some dialogue, either out loud or internal dialogue from mc.

Happy writing!

Jen

When writing dialogue, writers often break it up with things like, he continued. Instead of using those types of interjections, you can put a variety of things in there to flesh out your story. You can put in description of characters, their clothes, their hair, etc. You can do this for the MC (main character) as well as the other characters. For instance: Bill got out of the Suburban and shrugged on his heavy leather coat. It sure was cold out there, he thought, and shuddered. What did it feel like to die in this cold? He shuddered to think.

What I did in this last segment was combine three components you can intersperse in dialogue. I put in an action, shrugging on the coat, I put a physical description, the heavy leather coat, and I put in a thought. Then I put another action, the shuddering. You can show a few descriptions of the other character(s), or give a few ideas about the setting. This gives the reader a fuller picture of what’s happening, who the characters are, and what the setting looks like.

 

Please click here to email me or call or text me @ 801-602-2720. Thanks!